United States

In the United States, Libraries Without Borders has developed programs that expand access to information, education and cultural resources to high-need, often low-income communities. These initiatives focus on bridging the digital divide, a phenomenon that affects Americans across all demographics, from urban spaces to Native American reservations to rural areas.

Background

Although the United States is often regarded as a rich country, there are pockets of deep urban and rural poverty where various economic, social and civic challenges impact the well-being of millions. Over the past 30 years, levels of inequality in the United States have skyrocketed. According to key indicators of human development such as education, criminal justice and healthcare, there are communities in the United States with living standards comparable to post-conflict and developing societies.

Libraries Without Borders has focused its efforts on expanding access to information, education and cultural tools to these vulnerable communities. Because we firmly believe that libraries have a transformative impact on society – from fighting inequality to reinforcing critical skills to stimulating entrepreneurial energies – we have developed programs that bring this invaluable resource to the neediest people in America.

By partnering with local branches and various civil society organizations, we have launched innovative library programs in the Bronx and Detroit, as well as on Native American reservations. Through these initiatives, Libraries Without Borders has reimagined the physical and social purpose of the library, enabling it to serve as both a center of knowledge and a place where community members can look for work, get homework help, attend book readings, and even register to vote. We have gone into unconventional spaces – from housing lobbies to laundromats to city parks – to bring critical services like internet access, after school tutoring, e-mentoring and cultural preservation activities to people that often fall through the cracks.

 

Our approach

In the United States, Libraries Without Borders prioritizes specific areas of intervention that are rooted in on our knowledge of the country and its people, as well as the organization’s experience working to create libraries all over the world.

These priorities include:

  • Providing formal and informal educational support to low-income youth in an effort to reduce disparities in academic achievement.
  • Creating spaces where users can improve their reading, writing and computer skills. We have achieved this by partnering with libraries, schools, tutoring programs and local nonprofits to operate in housing lobbies, laundromats, and a variety of public spaces.
  • Offering pathways for professional development to poor and vulnerable adults.
  • Advocating for the universal right of children to access quality education. In 2015, Libraries Without Borders joined the Global Campaign for Education (GCE-US) in order to amplify its efforts to promote education as a fundamental right and urge American and international policymakers to ensure universal quality education for all.

More About Our Projects


The Ideas Box: Providing low-income students in Detroit with academic support

Objective

Access to education & culture


Start date

2016


Status

Closed


Background

After running a successful program in New York, the Detroit Mayor’s Office partnered with Libraries Without Borders to bring the Ideas Box to the Motor City. Once a beacon of American industrialism, Detroit currently has the highest rate of concentrated poverty in the United States, with nearly 40% of the population living below the federal poverty line. The poorest of Detroit’s residents also have significantly lower life expectancies than the poor of other cities in the United States, rendering them particularly vulnerable.

Activities

Libraries Without Borders partnered with the Detroit Mayor’s Office to run an after school and supplemental learning program using the Ideas Box. With support from the Detroit Public Library, Farwell Recreation Center, Mason Academy, Clark Park, Priest Elementary School, Golightly Educational Center, and Southwest Solutions, we were able to provide low income youth in neighborhoods with the highest rates of concentrated poverty with academic support after school, on weekends and over winter break.

Results

  • Libraries Without Borders conducted quantitative and qualitative assessments of the Ideas Box program in Detroit. These assessments, which consisted of interviews and surveys, found that many program participants gained short-term boosts in math test scores.
  • There was a high demand for the Ideas Box among local residents, which suggests a need for greater communal spaces in underserved communities throughout Detroit. For instance, programs that required pre-registration were always booked to capacity. For Noel Night, the Ideas Box welcomed over 1,000 visitors in 5 hours!

WITH SUPPORT FROM

Executive partners

Financial partners

The Ideas Box in the Bronx: Bridging the achievement gap over summer vacation

Objective

Access to education & culture


Start date

2016


Status

Closed


Background

 

Although New York City is one of the wealthiest cities in the world, there are striking disparities across its five boroughs. For instance, in the Bronx, residents experience higher rates of poverty and unemployment, in addition to lower educational attainment and poorer health outcomes. They are also less likely to have internet access; roughly 36 percent of households and 45 percent of seniors in the Bronx lack an internet connection at home.

While the city has taken steps to address these inequalities, they persist in specific neighborhoods such as Morris Heights. Situated in the Bronx, Morris Heights sits in the nation’s poorest congressional district. Almost half the population lives below the poverty line and receives some form of public assistance. Unemployment is also twice the national average, and over 36% of households are headed by single mothers. Given these circumstances, Libraries Without Borders forged a partnership with community organizations and the local library to bring the Ideas Box to Morris Heights over the summer. Recognizing that the summer is a time when low income students experience substantial learning loss, LWB used the Ideas Box to bring educational enrichment opportunities to high need students, preventing them from facing setbacks in their academic development.

To reach young people in the places where they live and socialize, LWB offered educational programs in various locations – from public parks to busy street corners, and from laundromats to the lobbies of low income housing projects.

Activities

Through the Ideas Box, Libraries Without Borders brought a variety of educational and informative resources to members of the Morris Heights community. Children participated in interactive sessions that improved their reading and writing skills, while young adults learned computer programming and video production skills. Members of the community were invited to join the activities, and many participated in workshops, including parents.

Results

  • The Ideas Boxes gave children and young adults a safe, dynamic and accessible space where they could continue learning over the summer, often improving their reading comprehension and math skills.
  • The Ideas Box provided workforce development tools that helped adults with professional skills.

WITH SUPPORT FROM

Executive partners

Financial partners

Logo Alexander Soros Foundation